Difference between revisions of "Italy"

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Italian reproductive specialists are now able to decide how many embryos will be best in order to achieve a pregnancy (removing the upper limit of three), and the duty to implant all embryos together has been removed, while still trying to limit the number of cryopreserved embryos, which cannot be destroyed or donated. For this reason, even though the Italian Constitutional Court removed some restrictions imposed by law 40/2004, problems such as the storage of cryopreserved embryos for an indefinite time remain unsolved.
 
Italian reproductive specialists are now able to decide how many embryos will be best in order to achieve a pregnancy (removing the upper limit of three), and the duty to implant all embryos together has been removed, while still trying to limit the number of cryopreserved embryos, which cannot be destroyed or donated. For this reason, even though the Italian Constitutional Court removed some restrictions imposed by law 40/2004, problems such as the storage of cryopreserved embryos for an indefinite time remain unsolved.
  
*In April 9, 2014 [http://www.altalex.com/index.php?idnot=67193], the Constitutional Court legitimized heterologous artificial insemination, declaring unconstitutional the sections of law number 40 of February 19, 2004, which prohibited heterologous fertilization.  
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*In April 9, 2014, the Constitutional Court legitimized heterologous artificial insemination, declaring unconstitutional the sections of law number 40 of February 19, 2004, which prohibited heterologous fertilization.<ref name=Altalex> Baldini, Gianni. "[http://www.altalex.com/index.php?idnot=67193 Fecondazione eterologa: incostituzionale il divieto della Legge 40]," ''Altalex'' (June 19, 2014).</ref>
  
 
*The Court declared the following sections unconstitutional:
 
*The Court declared the following sections unconstitutional:

Revision as of 20:41, 29 July 2015